The Dickens Example

From the 22 published works authored by Charles Dickens and featured on The Illustrations page of the excellent website The Charles Dickens Page, 18 feature illustrations where stemmed drinking vessels are present. Collected here for your review are those illustrations from those works. Most listings include an image carousel that you may click through to view each image individually. A brief description of each illustration, identifying why it was included in this set, is also included. Each section also includes a link to the full set of illustrations for that work (linking to The Charles Dickens Page) which includes additional information about the illustrators and publication dates.

Sketches by Boz

The Gin Shop

Of the 40 illustrations in Sketches by Boz, stemware is only evident in one:

  • The Gin Shop - The couple in the lower right have glasses in hand.

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Pickwick Papers

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Of the 45 illustrations in Pickwick Papers, four feature stemmed glasses and three show glasses in hand:

  • Mr Pickwick addresses the club - Everyone has a glass before them, some have them in their hands, grasped by the stem.
  • Job Trotter encounters Sam in Mr Muzzle's kitchen - One glass held aloft, by the stem.
  • The red-nosed man discourth - Two stemmed glasses on the table.
  • Weller and his friends drinking to Mr Pell - Five glasses held aloft, by their stems.

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Oliver Twist

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Of the 24 illustrations in Oliver Twist, none depict stemware held in the hand, but two show glasses on tables:

  • Mr Claypole as he appeared when his Master was out - Stemware on the table.
  • The Jew and Morris both begin to understand each other - Stemware on the table.

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Nicholas Nickleby

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Of the 39 illustrations in Nicholas Nickleby, three depict stemware held in the hand:

  • The Country Manager rehearses a combat - The gentleman on the right holds his glass by the stem.
  • Nicholas attracted by the mention of his sister's name in the coffee-room - A gentleman in the right background toasts with his glass delicately held by the stem (and even extending his pinkie finger!).
  • The last brawl between Sir Mulberry and his pupil - Even in the midst of a brawl two men still manage to hold their glasses by the stems!

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The Old Curiosity Shop

Of the 73 illustrations in The Old Curiosity Shop, four depict stemware held in the hand, more than in any other Dickens work:

  • An Interview with Codlin and Short - Here one person holds their glass very much by the stem, another, at the base of the bowl, but still by the stem (his glass appears to have a rather sort stem).
  • Nell in a faint - Nell is offered a drink from a stemmed glass, held by the stem.
  • A descriptive advertisement - Lots of glasses here, all held by the stems, one nearly by the base!
  • Uproarious hospitality - The man perched on the barrel holds his glass by the stem.

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Barnaby Rudge

Barnaby Rudge included 76 illustrations, more than any of Dickens's other works. Of these, however, only one depicts stemware held in the hand (well, both hands!), and two others show stemware present on a table.

  • Hugh calls on his patron - A two-handed drinker, Hugh holds both glasses by the stems.
  • Mr Chester's diplomacy - Stemmed glass and a couple of nice decanters on the table. Note the picture of Abraham and Isaac in the background.
  • Migg's short-lived joy - Stemware on the table.

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Martin Chuzzlewit

Of the 39 illustrations in Martin Chuzzlewit, three depict stemware held in the hand:

  • Mr Pinch and the new pupil on a social occasion - A stemmed glass held delicately by the stem very near the base.
  • Mr Jefferson Brick proposes an appropriate sentiment - All three men hold what appears to be champagne flutes, by the stem very near the base.
  • Mrs Gamp proposes a toast- Both women daintily hold their small glasses by the stems.

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Dombey and Son

Of the 40 illustrations in Dombey and Son, one depicts stemware held in the hand, two find stemware present on a table:

  • Profound cogitation of Captain Cuttle - An empty stemmed glass sits on the table.
  • Joe B. is sly, sir; devilish sly - Gentleman on the right presents his glass, held by the stem, to the waiter for a refill.
  • Mr Carker in his hour of triumph - Stemware and wine bottles on the table.

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David Copperfield

David Copperfield included 38 illustrations. Although stemware is found in four, only one depicts stemware held in the hand:

  • My magnificent order at the public-house - Various stemmed glasses sit on and behind the bar.
  • We are disturbed in our cookery - Stemmed glasses and decanters on the table.
  • Mr Micawber delivers some valedictory remarks - A woman on the left holds her glass by the stem.
  • The Wanderer - Stemware on the table.

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Bleak House

Of the 40 illustrations in Dombey and Son, only two show stemware, and these are only present on a table:

  • A new meaning in the Roman - A half full stemmed glass and a decanter sit on the table to the right.
  • Friendly behaviour of Mr Bucket- A stemmed glass sits on the table at the right.

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Mr Harthouse dining at the Bounderbys'

Hard Times

Hard Times was originally published without illustrations, but the 1862 reissue included four. One features stemware on the table:

  • Mr Harthouse dining at the Bounderbys' - Stemmed glasses are present on the table. It is possible that the woman on the left is holding a glass in her right hand. If so, the bowl is visible. Because of the uncertainty I have not counted this illustration as a "stemware in hand."

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Little Dorrit

Of the 40 illustrations in Little Dorrit, two feature stemmed glasses in hand:

  • Mr F's Aunt is conducted into retirement - The gentleman seated at the center of the table holds a stemmed glass, with a decanter in front of him.
  • An unexpected after-dinner speech - In this large gathering, at least the gentleman seated center left holds a stemmed glass.

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Tale of Two Cities

Of the 16 illustrations in Tale of Two Cities, two feature stemmed glasses in hand:

  • The double recognition - This is one of the few illustrations that shows (the fellow to the left in the background) a wine glass being held almost at the bottom of the bowl, but still grasped by the stem. Most illustrations featuring stemmed glasses in hand show the user deliberately, almost delicately, holding the glass nearer the base (like in the next illustration).
  • Frontispiece - The seated gentleman in the center holds his stemmed glass in the most common manner found in this complete set of illustrations.

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